• How to keep up with Android development

    The world of Android development is evolving rapidly, and as an Android developer, an important part of life is to stay up to date with everything. (more)

  • Making live wallpaper apps respond to touches correctly

    This post is about ensuring that a live wallpaper app scrolls properly on all Android devices. This is huge issue on certain launchers, as they are not calling the onOffsetsChanged() function correctly, which notifies the wallpaper app that the home screen was scrolled. Luckily, there is a workaround. (more)

  • Using the JobScheduler API

    As a part of Lollipop, Google introduced Project Volta, which emphasises on improving battery life. It contains a bunch of new APIs as well, focusing on measuring and reducing power consumption. One of these is the new JobScheduler API, which bundles tasks and defers them until certain conditions are met. (more)

  • Android version distribution in 2014, visualized

    Google just updated the developer dashboard with the most recent Android distribution numbers, measured during a 7-day period from the end of last year until the 5th of January. This is always an interesting read (not only for developers, but for Android-enthusiasts as well), and at the end of each year it is good to look back on what happened in 2014. Google releases these numbers every month, which I collected and made into a chart to visualize last year’s changes. (more)

  • Moving to Jekyll + GitHub Pages from WordPress

    I finally made the transition from WordPress to GitHub Pages, resulting in a minimal, hand-crafted blog, without using bootstrapping tools. This post contains what I went with, sticking to the bare essentials, plus some tips on SEO, related posts and redirects. (more)

  • Multitasking on steroids: managing documents in the Overview

    The multitasking screen has undergone some huge changes in the 5.0 release. It also has a new name: overview, with the items called documents. Before Lollipop, this screen could only display one item per app, but now it is possible to open multiple tasks per app, each of them appearing as a separate document in the overview. Moreover, the appearance of each document can be tailored to the app - this post will show you how. (more)

  • Migrating to RecyclerView from ListView

    Google introduced RecyclerView as a part of the support library as the next-gen ListView. It’s new, efficient and highly customisable, no wonder everyone wants to make the switch. This step-by-step guide will show you how to migrate from an existing ListView (or GridView / StaggeredGridView / ExpandableListView), replacing the implementation with a RecyclerView. (more)

  • Translucent system bars + ListView done right

    About a year ago, Google introduced the translucent UI in KitKat, making the system bars transparent, with a hint of black gradient. After activating, apps are able to draw under the status bar (the one on top of the screen, with the notifications) and the navigation bar (this is optional, only present devices with no hardware buttons, at the bottom of the screen, contains the back, home and app switcher keys), which can result in a slick and modern user experience if done right. (more)